5 Tips to Keep Your Health Stable During the Holiday Season

Posted on December 14th, 2017

Annex Naturopathic









Happy Holidays from us at Annex Naturopathic Clinic!



It’s a shared feeling amongst most people that this is a crazy, hectic time of year.



This typically leads to most of us neglecting our good healthy habits and trading it up for stress-coping indulgences from the vast number of treats the holiday season has to offer.



While as naturopathic doctors, we understand and encourage giving in to the season, letting loose and participating in some of these indulgences.



It’s also important to be mindful of HOW MUCH you’re indulging and whether the extent of the indulgences is negatively affecting the both your physical and mental health.



Here are 5 tips that allows you to let loose and indulge, while maintaining healthy weight and stable mental health during this busy time of year.



Keep Hydrated:



Not only is keeping hydrated important for maintaining healthy skin during these DRY winter months, it will also keep your stomach full, preventing your from NEEDING those 3-5 extra cookies available in the lunch room, or from getting “too tipsy” and then “too hungover” from the holiday parties.



Staying hydrated doesn’t mean drinking only water - you can keep hydrated by sipping on herbal teas as well, as long as they aren’t caffeinated.



Drink at least 2L (8 cups) of water or tea daily (6 cups of water, 2 cups of tea) to keep yourself hydrated.



You can drink your water warm, squeeze some lemon in to it, or use teas like chamomile, ginger, lemon balm and peppermint to keep yourself warm and strengthen your digestion and help you cope with stress (two things that are typically imbalanced during this time of year).





Avoid Carbohydrates:



When attending a holiday lunch or dinner, try sticking to meals that are low in carbohydrates (especially wheat-based carbs) and higher in protein, fats.



Also make sure to get a healthy dose of vegetables (greens in particular) with your meals, despite if the other foods are not as healthy.



The vegetables will ensure you’re getting SOME nutrients with these meals, bind excess fat, and provide fibre.



Avoiding the carbs will make your full quicker which will help keep the weight down, prevent blood sugar spikes and dips, and maintain your energy.



Cutting out the carbs during your meals also gives you some more wiggle room for sugary treats that are offered during this season.





Limit your Sugary Snacks:



It’s not realistic to avoid the vast amount of sugar that is served up this season - especially if you happen to have a sweet tooth.



By reducing your carb intake at your meals, it allows you to have a bit more room in your body for the pretty cookies and chocolate.



But don’t go overboard. Have ONE cookie, ONE piece of chocolate and wait - this allows you to taste the sweet, enjoy, and it won’t send you in to a frenzy of sugar highs and lows.



Blood sugar stabilization is extremely important in maintaining good energy during the day, maintaining weight and coping with the stress around us.



Sudden blood sugar spikes from indulging in too much sugar leads to sudden blood sugar drops, which make us tired, irritable, messes with our hormones that maintain our circadian rhythms, and makes us CRAVE more sugar in the long run!









Stick to low sugar drinks:



Starting off your night with a cold beer, nice glass of wine (or 2) with dinner, or a fancy cocktail its totally fine but if you decide to have a few drinks that night, it’s always wise to switch to drinks with a lower sugar content.



Not only will this prevent a nasty hangover, but it will also keep the waistline from expanding.



Mixing clear alcohols (like vodka, gin, tequila ) with club soda (not tonic!) with some lemon/lime, and ordering it in a “tall glass” with a “single shot” (therefore a higher club soda to alcohol ratio) will help you pace your alcohol so you don’t get too tipsy too quick, and keep you hydrated at the same time.



And most importantly NO POP - it’s not worth it.





Keep your indulgences to happy times, not stressful times:



This is an important aspect of mindful eating - you associate eating and drinking/indulging during times of socialization, relaxation and fun, instead of using sugar and alcohol for times when you’re stressed, need break or bored (eating sugar during in between work, or binging afterwork for no occasion).



This helps you disassociate from using these indulgences as a way to cope with stress and to “relax”, breaking the hard cycle that leads to ill-health in the long run.



Also, when you limit your indulgences to happy times, you’re less-likely to over-indulge, as you’re feeling happy, content and satisfied for many reasons, not just from food and drink.



These tips will allow you to enjoy your holiday indulgences guilt-free and let you start 2018 on a healthy path!





If you’re curious to learn more about this subject or would like to consult with one of our NDs feel free to book a visit or contact us.



Yours in Health,





Dr. Tanya Lee, N.D







Annex Naturopathic Clinic

572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1

- https://goo.gl/maps/uVRBvcyoUa62










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Top 5 Ways to Improve Digestion

Posted on December 6th, 2017

Annex Naturopathic









Digestive concerns are very common issue that we see here at Annex Naturopathic Clinic.



The following are some important tips to consider if you currently are experiencing or do experience digestive problems.



1. Chew your food.



A wise man once said, “your stomach doesn’t have teeth” and that’s one of the reasons we must thoroughly chew our food.



An integral part of the digestive process starts in our mouths.



Chewing, alongside the digestive enzymes in our saliva, starts the process of breaking down food so that the stomach acid and other enzymes released further down the gastrointestinal tract are better able to function.



Not chewing your food leads to symptoms of indigestion and decreases nutrient absorption.



2. Stop multi-tasking.



Our brain and our gut are connected.



When our brain is focused on tasks other than eating (replying to emails, driving, Instagram, ect.) our body is not is an ideal position to digest food.



Not to mention we often we faster and larger quantities when we are multi-tasking.



3. Slow down and relax.



To build of the last point, when you stop multi-tasking and slow down before you eat you allow the body to settle into its “parasympathetic” nervous system, also know as our “rest and digest” nervous system.



When we are on-the-go, working or multi-tasking our “sympathetic” nervous system is predominant.



When we are in this state, we are primed to be on alert, with blood flow moving towards our brain and periphery- away from on digestive tract.



Taking a few deep breaths and relaxing while you eat (eating with others helps) you will digest your meal better.









4. Avoid excess liquids around meals.



A common misconception regarding diet is that we should drink a lot of water with our meals.



This is problematic as excess liquid intake around meals will actually dilute our gastric juices- like stomach acid and other digestive enzymes- making it harder to break down food.



It is best to avoid drinking large quantities of water or other liquids 30 minutes before and after meals.



Sipping beverages with your meal will not cause an issues.



5. Eat when you are hungry.



Often people are eating for other reasons than hunger.



People eat because it is lunchtime- even though they may have ate a late breakfast.



People eat because they are tired, stressed, bored or sad.



Making sure you are actually hungry when you eat will improve digestion as your body is primed to receive food.



You’ll notice when you are hungry and you see your food and can sense you saliva production begin to increase.



At this point, you should implement the above 4 points and have significantly improved digestion.







If you’re curious to learn more about this subject or would like to consult with one of our NDs feel free to book a visit or contact us.



Yours in Health,





Dr. Marnie Luck, N.D







Annex Naturopathic Clinic

572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1

- https://goo.gl/maps/uVRBvcyoUa62










To learn additional ideas about health, wellness, and alternative medicine, please visit us here: toronto naturopaths




Botanical of the Month – Echinacea spp

Posted on November 29th, 2017

Annex Naturopathic









On the theme of cold and flu season, as a Toronto ND I thought it would be appropriate to talk about one of the most commonly used botanical remedies for viral and bacterial infections - Echinacea spp.



Echinacea is also one of the most researched herbs in the world, with much of the research centred around its effects on boosting immune health and killing off pathogens, which is why it’s such a valuable herb during this season.



There are different types of Echinacea, with three species being the most commonly sold as medicine: Echinacea purpurea, Echinacea angustifolia, and Echinacea palladium.



Most of the research that supports the medicinal value of Echinacea is mainly centred around Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea, and should be the type of Echinacea you should choose which looking for a good brand.



For the rest of the article, I will refer to Echinacea angustifolia and Echinacea purpurea when outlining the medicinal value of Echinacea spp.



Echinacea, also known by its descriptive name, Purple Cone Flower, is part of the Asteraceae (Composite) family, and Native to North America, mainly growing in the Western prairie states, such as Illinois, Nebraska, Missouri and Texas.1



The plant grows to about 2-3 feet high, blooms from June to August and reveals purple and rose petals.



Echinacea is a relatively new plant to botanical medicine, as it is rarely mentioned in texts older than 1850.



From there, the antibiotic/antiviral properties of Echinacea were described in medicinal writings as a “blood-purifying”, being used for conditions such as ulcerated sore throats, internal abscesses, malarial fevers, cholera, and insect/reptile bites.1



These findings have paved the way for abundance of research supporting the effects of Echinacea in the treatment of infections.



Native American medicine mainly used this plant for topical infections, such as wounds, burns and insect bites.2



Parts Used



Root (some preparations use aerial parts as well)



How does Echinacea protect your body from viral and bacterial infections



The medicinal properties of Echinacea reveal that it has the best effect when used to PREVENT infection, and at the FIRST SIGNS of infection.



Echinacea directly repairs damaged tissue caused by the infection.



When a pathogen first infects a mucous membrane, such as the back of the throat, it will activate an enzyme called hyaluronidase, which breaks down our protective tissue and mucus, allowing the virus to enter the tissue and cause inflammation (and therefore pain).



Echinacea can prevent this process through inhibiting the hyaluronidase activity and by reinforcing the connective tissue, and preventing the pathogen to infiltrate the tissue infect.2,3



Echinacea boosts the immune system and reduces inflammation.3,4,5



One of the immune-stimulating mechanisms involve activating our macrophages, which are important for killing off pathogens and removing them and other cellular debris from the area.3,4,6



This process aids in reducing inflammation, preventing the spread of infection, and improving healing time.



Echinacea appears to enhance the innate immune system (our first line of defence) as well as reducing biochemicals produced by our bodies that stimulate inflammation, such as TNF-α, COX-1 and COX-2.6



Biochemicals in Echinacea responsible for these effects include alkamides and caffeic acid, and long sugars called polysacchrides.5,6









Does Echinacea Work?



In 2014, a Cochrane Review was published claiming that Echinacea did not appear to be effective in treating the common cold, and may have potential benefit in preventing the cold.7



While this may not be an encouraging statement on the value of Echinacea, the results from this study are more-so based on the lack available studies, rather than the inefficiency of the herb itself.



There is a plethora of pharmacological evidence that shows Echinacea boosting immune activity and exhibit anti-pathogenic qualities, but we don’t seem to have enough well-designed clinical studies to prove its benefit - YET.



Bottom line is that we need more studies that prove Echinacea works.



Many physicians see Echinacea work in clinical practice.



Anecdotal evidence finds the dosing and timing of Echinacea is an important factor on whether it will work.



Based in its pharmacological profile, it makes sense to dose Echinacea at first signs of a cold, preventing the virus to spread.



Once a virus infects your body systemically, it’s unlikely that anything at this point will prevent you from feeling sick.



At this point, the anti-inflammatory and immuno-stimulating effects of Echinacea can help by reducing the severity of the infection and preventing the worsening of the condition, such as being infected by a secondary pathogen (like other viruses and bacteria) causing conditions such as pneumonia.



Don’t expect anything to “get rid” of the cold once you’re sick - your body has to go through the process of ridding the body of the infection, which is the only way to recover, and Echinacea can help your body do exactly this.



Safety



Echinacea has been confirmed to be a safe herbal medicine in with minimal side effects and adverse event profile, which no toxicological concerns when ingested for up to 6 months.8,9,10



Echinacea used in children for cough and cold is generally well-tolerated, but can increase the risk of rash in children with atopic disease such as allergies and eczema and therefore should be used with caution.10 Children should only be given Echinacea on the advice from a qualified doctor who has strong training in herbal medicine.



Echinacea has also been found to be safe to use in pregnancy, with no increase in malformations and adverse effects in pregnancy, such as preterm birth, low birth weight,.10,11,12 However it’s best recommended to limit use to only when one is actively sick, or about to get sick while pregnant, and to be recommended by a qualified doctor trained in herbal medicine.10,12



Those who have a Asteraceae family allergy should stay away from Echinacea, and long-term use of Echinacea is not recommended for those with autoimmune disease.



Echinacea is a useful plant for the prevention and treatment for the common cold.



When Echinacea works, not only does it prevent duration and severity of cold, it reduces the need to use other medications riddled with adverse effects and a worse toxicity profile such as acetominophen, antibiotics and anti-inflammatory drugs.



Not to mention that these pharmaceuticals do not enhance immune anti-viral activity like Echincea has been proven to do.



With the help of a qualified doctor experienced in herbal medicine, Echinacea can be a valuable tool in your cold-prevention and treatment kit.







If you’re curious to learn more about this subject or would like to consult with one of our NDs feel free to book a visit or contact us.



Yours in Health,





Dr. Tanya Lee, N.D







Annex Naturopathic Clinic

572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1

- https://goo.gl/maps/uVRBvcyoUa62








References





    King, J. King's American Dispensatory. Ohio Valley Company, 1898


    Tragni al. Evidence from two classic irritation tests for an anti-inflammatory action of a natural extract, Echinacina B.Food Chem Toxicol. 1985 Feb;23(2):317-9.


    Medical Herbalism: hoffman


    Tubaro et. al. Anti-inflammatory activity of a polysaccharidic fraction of Echinacea angustifolia.J Pharm Pharmacol. 1987 Jul;39(7):567-9.


    Aarland RC al Studies on phytochemical, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, hypoglycaemic and antiproliferative activities of Echinacea purpurea and Echinacea angustifolia extracts.Pharm Biol. 2017 Dec;55(1):649-656.


    Manayi A et. al. Echinacea purpurea: Pharmacology, phytochemistry and analysis methods.Pharmacogn Rev. 2015 Jan-Jun;9(17):63-72.


    Karsch-Völk M et. al. Echinacea for preventing and treating the common cold.Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2014 Feb 20;(2)


    World Health Organization. WHO Monographs on Selected Medicinal Plants, Volume 1, World Health Organization, 1999


    Jawad, M et. al. Safety and Efficacy Profile of Echinacea purpurea to Prevent Common Cold Episodes: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Trial. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012; 2012: 841315


    Ardjomand-Woelkart K, Bauer R. Review and Assessment of Medicinal Safety Data of Orally Used Echinacea Preparations.Planta Med. 2016 Jan;82(1-2):17-31.


    Heitmann K al. Pregnancy outcomes after prenatal exposure to echinacea: the Norwegian Mother and Child Cohort Study.Eur J Clin Pharmacol. 2016 May;72(5):623-30.


    Perri D. et. al. Safety and efficacy of echinacea (Echinacea angustafolia, e. purpurea and e. pallida) during pregnancy and lactation.Can J Clin Pharmacol. 2006 Fall;13(3):e262-7.


    Gallo M, Sarkar M, Au W, Pietrzak K, Comas B, Smith M, Jaeger TV, Einarson A, Koren G (2000) Pregnancy outcome following gestational exposure to echinacea: a prospective controlled study. Arch Intern Med 160(20):3141–3143


To find additional ways on health, wellness, and alternative medicine, please visit us here: natural doctor


5 Immune Boosting Tips For Preventing Colds

Posted on November 21st, 2017

Annex Naturopathic









The common cold is a viral infection that is highly contagious.



That is precisely why it can seems like everyone is sick at the same time.



A combination of factors can increase the chance of getting sick: lack of sleep, exposure to other people who are sick, poor diet, stress, and nutritional deficiencies.



Being a naturoapthic doctor in Toronto, I see my share of patients with colds throughout the winter months.



Helping them take better control of their health is part of what I do.



Preventing colds in the first place is a great start for keeping yourself and those around you at your healthiest.



Here are 5 tips I share with my patients that should help prevent you from catching that cold that's going around this season:



1. Sleep.



Hopefully I can shed some new light (or perhaps darkness) on the subject.



Restful sleep is essential for optimizing our immune response.



Aspects of our modern lifestyle can drastically disrupt our sleep.



Do you lie in bed scrolling through Instagram and Facebook?



Maybe Netflix is streaming?



The light from our devices and the electromagnetic fields they emit (not to mention the cognitive stimulus) can adversely affect our bodies and sleep patterns.



Implementing a “no phones or laptops in the bedroom rule" will improve your sleep quality.



You may be thinking- “I can’t do that, my phone is my alarm clock, so it has to stay in my bedroom".



No problem- set it to airplane mode and wifi off.



Your alarm will sound, but your phone won’t be lighting up, vibrating, buzzing or searching for wifi or network signals beside your head all night.



2. Vitamin C, and other Supplements and Herbs.



The options can see overwhelming , and the average person may not know which vitamins and herbs to take, in which form or how much.



Not to mention, all supplements aren't created equally.



Seeing a naturopathic doctor for a safe and effective protocol is advisable.



However, Vitamin C is a great start- you can safely supplement with about 2000 mg daily (be sure to take it in divided doses as it can cause diarrhea if taken all at once).



You may be wondering if drinking orange juice would be a good idea when you have a cold.



Unfortunately it’s not going to help, as the juice is high in sugar content and it would take 25 oranges to obtain 2000 mg of vitamin C.



Vitamin D also plays an important role in immune function.



Canadian guidelines recommend that we supplement with 1000 IU daily year round- however, many people are deficient and their MD/ND may recommend a much higher daily dosage.



I often order a vitamin D blood test when there is concern of deficiency and then dose appropriately for my patients to achieve optimal serum levels.



Zinc is another vitamin that supports our immune system- dosages will vary per individual, and also note that taking zinc supplements on an empty stomach may cause nausea.



Further supplementation and the inclusion of herbal protocols is best done under the supervision of an ND.



3. Sugar-free.



Avoid eating excess sugar and refined carbohydrates.



Sugar suppresses the immune system.



A study showed that healthy volunteers who ingested 100 g of sugar (equivalent to about 2 cans of Coca Cola) caused a significant decrease in the capacity of immune cells to engulf bacteria.









4. Broth.



Good old fashioned chicken soup.



Broths keeps us warm and hydrated.



Chicken soup has been shown to have in-vitro anti-inflammatory effects aiding with the thinning of chest congestion, mucous and improving coughs.



Here is link to the study if you’d like to read more.



I recommend making your own broth from scratch, and then increasing its immune boosting properties with a tried and true combination of Chinese herbs to brew up a Change of Season Soup.



5. Reduce your exposure to germs.



Wash your hands, and wash them often.



Give sick people their space- be supportive of the utilization of sick days and working from home.



If you do get sick, reduce exposing your sickness to others- especially those who may not be able to mount adequate immune responses (the elderly, individuals with chronic illness, infants).



If you feel like you are chronically getting sick and it takes you a long time to get better, it may be a good idea to have a thorough assessment done with a naturopathic doctor.





If you’re curious to learn more about this subject or would like to consult with one of our NDs feel free to book a visit or contact us.



Yours in Health,





Dr. Marnie Luck, N.D







Annex Naturopathic Clinic

572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1

- https://goo.gl/maps/uVRBvcyoUa62








To read more tips about health, wellness, and alternative medicine, please visit us here: nd toronto


Optimizing Fertility: Natural Ways to Support Egg Quality

Posted on November 15th, 2017

Annex Naturopathic









Today, many women are choosing to have children later in life than previous generations.



Fertility treatments are a common option for those with difficulty conceiving naturally.



Creating the conditions for optimal egg quality is an important factor in achieving and maintaining a healthy pregnancy.



Women are born with a set number of oocytes (eggs) and from puberty until menopause, an egg should be released from the ovary (ovulation) each month.



The quality of the egg depends on the health of its mitochondria - the powerhouse- or energy production of the cell.



The more mitochondria the healthier the egg.



As women age, they have reduced mitochondrial activity- and therefore, reduced energy production which adversely affects the egg’s viability.



Contributing Factors to Diminished Ovarian Reserve 1:





Advanced maternal age.


Exposure to systemic chemotherapy.


Exposure to pelvic irradiation.


Cigarette smoking.


Endometriosis.


Surgical procedures to the ovary.


Auto-immune disorders.


Environmental exposures.


Endocrine disorders (diabetes, PCOS).


Regardless of contributing factor, there are multiple ways to support egg quality.









How To Support Egg Quality:



Reduce Oxidative Stress





Quit smoking. Smoking increases oxidative stress and accelerates time to menopause. Cessation of smoking should happen 3-6 months before initiation of treatment (dependant on age and ovarian reserve).2



Decrease alcohol consumption. Alcohol is a reproduction toxin that can increases oxidative stress.


Improve pelvic blood flow



Exercise increases blood flow to the core and pelvic organs, while improving sexual function and mood. Moderate exercise also reduces inflammation and oxidative stress.



Increase anti-oxidants



Both in the diet and in supplement form, anti-oxidants have a protective effect on the ovaries and their mitochondira.



Bright coloured fruits and vegetable contain high amounts of anti-oxidants.



Supplemental anti-oxidants include: melatonin, pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ), alpha-lipoid acid (ALA), and resveratrol.



Support mitochondria



Although all the aforementioned points all act to support the mitochondria, there are more nutrients that support the ovaries in different ways.



A nutrient called “inostitol” improves glucose uptake and helps ensure the mitochondria of the ovaries have optimal fuel.



Another nutrient, “carnitine”, plays a role in metabolism of fatty-acids to produce energy through a process called beta-oxidation.



This process is also essential for egg maturation.



Optimize hormones and blood sugar





Reduce sugar consumption and lose excess weight. Increased insulin levels leases to imbalances of sex hormones and altered ovulation. Obese women have altered mitochondrial function.3



Women with impaired blood sugar regulation have more difficulty conceiving.4



Naturopaths are able to appropriately recommend diet, lifestyle and nutritional supplementation to help support egg quality and fertility.



The naturopathic doctors at Annex Naturopathic Clinic are experienced in working with fertility and helping women achieve and maintain healthy pregnancies.





If you’re curious to learn more about this subject or would like to consult with one of our NDs feel free to book a visit or contact us.



Yours in Health,





Dr. Marnie Luck, N.D







Annex Naturopathic Clinic

572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1

- https://goo.gl/maps/uVRBvcyoUa62








References:





    ESHRE Guideline: management of women with premature ovarian insufficiency. Human Reproduc'on. 2016;31(5):926–37.


    Hughes E, Lamont D, BeecroO M, Wilson D, Brennan B, Rice S. Randomized trial of a “stage-of- change” oriented smoking cessa'on interven'on in infer'le and pregnant women. Fer'lity and Sterility. 2000;74(3):498-503.


    Pertynska-Marczewska M, Diaman'-Kandarakis E. Aging ovary and the role for advanced glyca'on end products. Menopause. 2017;24(3):345-351.


    Hjollund, NH et al. Is glycosylated haemoglobin a marker of fertility? A follow-up study of first pregnancy planners. Hum Reprod. 1999 Jun: 14(6)1478-82.


To discover additional information about health, wellness, and alternative medicine, please visit us here: toronto naturopathic doctor


Vegan Dahl: A Seasonal Comfort Food Recipe

Posted on November 8th, 2017

Annex Naturopathic









The change from hot to cold weather has me searching for comfort foods that will provide the feeling of warmth and energy.



As a N.D I'm regularly informing patients about healthy recipes and encouraging them to create a diet around the changing seasons.



One of my favourite spice palettes during the winter season is the warm, aromatic flavours of Indian cuisine - likely because it’s full of warming, sweet spices designed by nature to boost our metabolism, increase circulation and strengthen digestion, all properties that we need to warm our bodies during the colder seasons.



Any warm recipe containing these spices will be a good choice for the upcoming winter.



Dahl is essentially made up of lentils, which are packed with protein, B vitamins, fibre and iron, making this legume a super food, especially for vegetarians/vegans.



Lentils are an amazing source of protein because it contains all but two of the amino acids (the building blocks of protein).



Lentils are high in one particular amino acid, lysine, a great remedy for viral infections, handy during cold and flu season.



Top this on a small bed of basmati rice, or enjoy with a few whole grain (non-GMO) crackers.



Ingredients



3 tablespoons coconut oil (or whatever you have)



1 medium yellow onion



1 tablespoon fresh ginger, grated



4 garlic cloves, minced



2 cups of spinach or chopped kale



1 teaspoon of fine seasalt



1 cup dried red lentils



2 tablespoon tomato paste



4-5 cups water or veg broth



5 plum tomatoes, chopped



juice of 1 lime



1 cup lightly packed chopped fresh cilantro



Spice blend



2 teaspoon mustard seeds



1 teaspoon fenugreek seeds



1 teaspoon coriander seeds



1 teaspoon cumin seeds



6 whole cloves



4 cardamom pods



2 dried red chilies (seeds removed)



1/4 teaspoon ground cinnamon









Directions





In a sauté pan over medium heat, toast the seeds (but not the dried red chili) for about 5 minutes, stirring frequently (make sure not to burn). Be prepare for a strong (but pleasant), spicy aroma.


Remove from pan and let cool. Transfer to coffee grinder, along with the dried red chili and cinnamon, and grind to a fine powder.


Over medium-high heat oil a soup pot, add onions and sauté for 5 minutes. Add garlic and ginger and sauté 5 more minutes. Add ground spices and salt, sauté for 3 more


Add 4 cups of water and stir to deglaze the pot. Add tomato paste and lentils. Bring to a boil then lower the heat a bit and simmer for 20 minutes.


Add the tomatoes, greens, lime juice and cilantro and more water if it looks to thick. Simmer 10 more minutes, or until lentils are completely tender.


Add extra salt as needed for taste


Some Tips to Cooking with Spices





You can buy all these spices at any bulk food store store them in a dark cook place




Spices like ground cumin and coriander go rancid 6 months after they are ground up that is why you should grind them yourself, rather than buying pre-ground versions keep them in the refrigerator and use within 6 months




Toasting the seeds before grinding activates and releases the volatile oils in the seeds, producing the well-known aroma of Indian dishes




YOU NEED SALT for any dish that uses these spices salt activates and brings out the flavours of other spices without it you will be disappointed in the overall taste (add salt according to preferred taste but not too much!)






If you’re curious to learn more about this subject or would like to consult with one of our NDs feel free to book a visit or contact us.



Yours in Health,





Dr. Tanya Lee, N.D







Annex Naturopathic Clinic

572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1

- https://goo.gl/maps/uVRBvcyoUa62








To find more tips about health, wellness, and alternative medicine, please visit us here: holistic doctors


A Sleep Technique For When You Have A Cough and Congestion

Posted on October 31st, 2017

Annex Naturopathic









Cold and flu season is here and one of the worst parts of getting sick is the stuffy nose and stubborn mucus that just wants to keep you from getting a good night’s sleep.



As a naturopathic doctor in Toronto, many patients ask if there are natural, non-drug ways to manage congestion and allow for a good night's sleep.



Congestion in the sinuses prevents one from breathing through the nose while sleeping, forcing us to breathe through our mouths that can lead to throat dryness, irritation.



This could leave to coughing or chronic lung congestion can may cause incessant coughing, preventing one from sleeping throughout the night.



Sleep is extremely important for recovery when you’re sick.



Warming socks technique for a good night's sleep



The warming sock technique is done at night in order to battle these symptoms.



It can also help reduce temperature if there is also a fever present.









What you will need for this technique:





One pair of normal thickness socks


One pair of thick wool socks


Extra blanket for your feet for extra warming


Directions:





    If your feet are icy cold it is important to warm them first.This is very important as the treatment will not be as effective and could be harmful.Warming can be accomplished by soaking in warm water for 5-10 minutes.




    Next, take a pair of thin cotton socks and thoroughly wet all but the ankle portion with cold water.Wring them out so they are not dripping




    Walk to bed and place the wet socks on your feet.




    Then cover with thick wool socks.




    Get comfy in your bed tucked in with plenty of warm blankets to fall asleep - you can use the extra blanket on the feet if needed.




    Get an uninterrupted night of sleep.




    In the morning you will find that the wet cotton socks will be dry, and you will feel well rested from a great night’s sleep!


In response to the wet socks placed on your feet, the body sends the circulation of blood and lymph (therefore some heat) down to warm the feet, pulling along the congestion from the head and lungs, allowing drainage through the lymphatic system.



Many of my patients report being able to get a full night's sleep when using the wet socks for cough and congestion.



If you feel this will be uncomfortable, don’t fret - the discomfort of wet socks on your feet tends to let up after a couple of minutes.



You wake up with completely dry feet!



This can be used for the whole family, ages through 100





If you’re curious to learn more about this subject or would like to consult with one of our NDs feel free to book a visit or contact us.



Yours in Health,





Dr. Tanya Lee, N.D







Annex Naturopathic Clinic

572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1

- https://goo.gl/maps/uVRBvcyoUa62








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A No-Bake Breakfast Cookie Recipe For Healthy Eating On The Go

Posted on October 25th, 2017

Annex Naturopathic









I call this recipe, “reverse engineering at its finest".



I kept taking a detour on my morning walks with my pup, Maeve, to grab one of these cookies from a local cafe- so I decided to make them myself!



This cookie is great on its own for breakfast, and also makes a great snack when you are on the go.



Not to mention, it’s absolutely refined sugar-free, dairy-free, egg-free, gluten-free and nut-free making this an extremely “hypo-allergenic” cookie.



A great option for school lunches. And the best part- these cookies taste great!



They fit almost every “health nut” parameter, being both vegan and raw.



Watch this video to see how it’s done



[embed] https://youtu.be/bZLFTP4lBrI[/embed]



Ingredients:



2 cup gluten-free rolled oats

1 banana (ripe)

1 cup unsweetened shredded coconut flakes

8 dates

6 tbsp water

1/2 bar 70-85% dark chocolate

2 tsp cinnamon

1 tsp sea salt

Makes 12 cookies.









Step 1:



Blend water & dates.



You can use a food processor, a magic bullet, or blender.



Once thoroughly mixed, add banana and blend until a paste is formed.



Step 2:



Mix together the dry ingredients: the rolled oats, coconut, sea salt, and cinnamon.



Step 3:



Combine the banana-date mixture with the dry ingredients.



Step 4:



Chop the chocolate and mix it in with step 3.



Step 5:



Using mason jar lids, form your cookies by firmly pressing the mixture into the lids.









Place in plastic ziploc bag or container and place in freezer for 1 hour to harden.



Remove from freezer and enjoy.



Store cookies in fridge or freezer.



If storing the cookies together, separate them by squares of parchment paper.







If you’re curious to learn more about this subject or would like to consult with one of our NDs feel free to book a visit or contact us.



Yours in Health,





Dr. Marnie Luck, N.D







Annex Naturopathic Clinic

572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1

- https://goo.gl/maps/uVRBvcyoUa62








To discover additional ideas on health, wellness, and alternative medicine, please visit us here: best naturopaths in toronto


A Seasonal Garlic Honey Recipe For Sore Throats

Posted on October 17th, 2017

Annex Naturopathic









’Tis the season for sore throats!



The fluctuating temperatures of the change of seasons renders our immune system weak, making our bodies susceptible to these floating viruses waiting to find a host.



Or that person standing right near you is just waiting to pass on their strept infection (they may not even know they have it yet).



One of the most common symptoms people experience when catching a cold (or a more severe viral or bacterial infection) is a sore throat.



Being a naturopathic doctor in Toronto, regularly around this time of year I receive many inquiries on how to treat cold symptoms.



There are a number of ways to remedy a sore throat, but one of the most effective (and tasty!) ways is to take a spoonful of raw, unpasteurized HONEY, infused with garlic in order to soothe and heal this delicate mucus membrane.



Medical properties of Honey



Honey has been long used as medicine - with its use dating back to 5500BC until now, the properties of honey have been found to be efiective for infections (internal and external), wound healing, lowering cholesterol and cardiovascular risk.



Honey has potent anti-microbial properties, where studies have shown antimicrobial activity against a number of gram positive and gram negative bacteria, such as Haemophilus influenzae, the Streptococcus family, and the antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA.1



Anti-viral properties of honey have been studies, one finding that honey given to children with upper respiratory tract infections can reduce cough at night time.2



There are many mechanisms involved with the anti-bacterial and anti-viral properties of honey, but one of the most simplest ones comes from the fact that honey blocks the attachment of “bugs" to the tissues they’re trying to infect.



This is important when you’re exposed to someone with strept throat, or sore throat in general - by taking honey after exposure, you may be able to prevent the actual attachment and incubation of this bacteria, steering clear of infection.



On top of it’s anti-viral and anti-microbial properties, honey is also very soothing to the throat; it’s strong wound-healing properties stimulates the repair of damaged tissues and protection of mucus membranes from inflammation.



Add garlic to increase the anti-microbial, anti-viral effect



The anti-viral and anti-microbial and immune boosting properties of garlic have been long known in the medical community,3,4 so it’s a no brainer that combining these two natural foods would be a great way to battle sore throats and fight infection.



Along with it’s ability to fight infection, garlic is full of antioxidants (vitamin C, selenium, B-vitamins etc.), which can help keep the immune system strong during an infection.



By adding honey to the garlic, the slow-moving viscous honey can coat the throat, allowing the anti-viral, antimicrobial properties of both honey and garlic act longer on the affected tissues.









Recipe



This is a very easy recipe - there are many on the web, but this is how I like to make this amazing remedy.



Ingredients





125mL or 250mL jars - or larger if you want to make a big batch!


Raw, Unpasturized, Honey (Pasturization of honey rids this functional food of all it’s beneficial properties so isn’t beneficial to use)


1 head of organic garlic for 125mL or 2 heads of garlic for 250mL (or enough garlic to fill about 1/3 of the jar you would like to use)


Directions





Break apart the garlic head. Crush the garlic with the flat surface of the knife (this will activate the garlic, release the juices, making it more potent, and it helps you peel the garlic quicker).


Peel garlic and place the activated garlic in the jar - filling 1/3 of the jar.


Fill the jar with honey


Close the lid and store in a dark, cool place for at least a month before use (giving a good shake every week)


Separate the cloves from the honey, to store in their own, air-tight jars. Keep the honey in a dark, cool place such as a cellar or the refrigerator. If you’re saving the cloves, they should definitely go in to the refrigerator.


Medicinal Use



At first signs of infection, you can actually eat the garlic to fight off the infection, but if you don’t want to do this (it’s potent!!), discard.



You can use the cloves for cooking to reduce waste and to give your dishes some extra flare (ahem, it’s amazing in salsas, and coconut curries).



Keep them in the fridge.



The garlic cloves don’t keep as long so use within the month after infusing.



The garlic infused honey should be good for up to a year.



Take 1/2 to 1 tsp of honey when you’re feeling a sore throat.



You can take this up to 3-4x/day (it’s pretty sweet and sugary so you don’t want to take too much!).



A great way to use this is for when you or your family are waking up with a sore throat because congested sinuses are forcing you to breathe through the mouth throughout the night.



If this is the case, taking it before bed, and on waking can help.



Due to the potent antimicrobial and anti-fungal effects of garlic and honey, this will prevent bacterial (Clostridium botulinum) and mold buildup in the honey, so this can keep for a while (a whole season).



I’ve never encountered any contamination of my garlic honey, but make sure to use CLEAN equipment when making this, and make sure to wash your hands thoroughly before handling any ingredient.



DO NOT GIVE HONEY TO CHILDREN UNDER 1.5 YEARS OLD. Honey contains natural botulism spores. In kids over 1 and adults, our immune systems are strong and built up enough to naturally clear these spores.



Babies under 1 years old do not have the immune system to clear these spores and are at risk for botulism toxicity (floppy baby syndrome) and should NOT be fed honey.



Bees are special - they pollinate our plants, encourage genetic strength and survival of these plants by promoting cross-pollination, and are the only insects that produce food for human consumption.



They are important for our survival so please buy honey from ethical, sustainable farms.





If you’re curious to learn more about this subject or would like to consult with one of our NDs feel free to book a visit or contact us.



Yours in Health,





Dr. Tanya Lee, N.D







Annex Naturopathic Clinic

572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1

- https://goo.gl/maps/uVRBvcyoUa62








References





Israili ZH., Antimicrobial properties of honey.Am J Ther. 2014 Jul-Aug;21(4):304-23


Cotton MF, Innes S, Jaspan H, et al. Management of upper respiratory tract infections in children. So Afr Fam Pract. 2008;50:6–12


Goncagul G, Ayaz EAntimicrobial effect of garlic (Allium sativum).Recent Pat Antiinfect Drug Discov. 2010 Jan;5(1):91-3.


Harris JC. et. al. Antimicrobial properties of Allium sativum (garlic).Appl Microbiol Biotechnol. 2001 Oct;57(3):282-6.


To learn more information about health, wellness, and alternative medicine, please visit us here: Annex Naturopathic Toronto


Breast Cancer: Understanding the Risk Factors

Posted on October 10th, 2017

Annex Naturopathic









At our naturopathic clinic, one of our main areas of focus is naturopathy for women's health.



We often see women or hear stories about others who have been affected by cancer in their live's.



Today's article's goal is to provide further understanding around breast cancer, specifically risk factors and prevention, for both women and men.



Women and Breast Cancer



Breast cancer is the most common cancer diagnosis in women over the age of 20.



Research from the Canadian Cancer Society estimates that 1 in 8 Canadian Women will have breast cancer in her lifetime, and 1 in 31 will die from it.



Reducing risk and early detection are important factors in decreasing the amount of people affected by breast cancer.



Understanding the risk factors



There are 2 types of risk factors.



These factors are classified as those that are non-modifiable, such as age, family history, and genetics, and those that can be modified, such as physical activity or smoking.



Non-modifiable risk factors



Gender:



Breast cancer is significantly more common in Females.



Men with breast cancer make up fewer than 1% of all cases.



Age:



78% of new breast cancer diagnosis occur in women older than 501.



About half of all new cases of breast cancer occur in this age group.



Genetics:



BRCA1 and BRCA2 are tumor suppressor genes - they play a role in the body’s ability to stop cancer from happening.



5-10% of all breast cancers are linked to mutations in these genes.



BRCA1 and BRCA2 occur in less than 1% of the populations, however, women with these gene mutations have up to an 80% risk of developing breast cancer by age 802.



Personal or family history of breast cancer:



A woman with cancer in one breast has a 3- to 4-fold increased risk of developing a new cancer in the other breast or in another part of the same breast3.



Women who has first-degree relatives with a history of breast cancer has has an increased risk.



Someone with one first-degree relative with breast cancer approximately doubles a woman’s risk.



The more first-degree relatives (sister, mother, daughter) with breast cancer, the greater the risk.1



Menstrual History:



Women whose first period was at age 11 or younger and/or women who experience menopause after age 55 have an increased risk of breast cancer.



Those who have more menstrual cycles throughout her lifetime, have greater exposure to estrogen and its metabolites.



Similarly, women who have had one or more pregnancies, have a greater protection against breast cancer.



Pregnancy limits the exposure of breast cells to estrogen and lowers the total number of menstrual cycles a woman has in her lifetime.4



Breast Density:



Breast contain fatty tissue as well as dense tissue such as connective, gland and milk duct tissues.



Women with dense breast tissue in 75% or more of their breasts have a 4-5 fold greater risk of breast cancer.5



Modifiable Risk Factors



Body weight and physical activity:



Women who are overweight have an increased risk of developing breast cancer.



Breast cancer may be influenced by the amount of estrogen tissue in the breast is exposed to over time.



In addition to the ovaries, estrogen is also produced in fat tissue.



Therefore, higher body-weight due to excess fat tissue can increase estrogen levels.



Those who do not exercise also have an increased risk.



Alcohol and smoking:



Smoking increases overall cancer risk, including breast cancer.



Alcohol consumption increases a woman’s risk for breast cancer.



Even low levels of alcohol consumption (just over 1 drink per day) can increase a woman’s risk.



The risk increases with the amount of alcohol consumed.









New Research Surrounding Possible Risk Factors



Lack of exposure to sunlight and low vitamin D levels:



There are multiple recent studies that demonstrate that vitamin D deficiency significantly increases breast cancer risk.



While at the same time, another study showed that women with elevated risk, who had high serum 25(OH) vitamin D levels because of regular vitamin D supplementation were associated with lower rates of incident, especially in the postmenopausal population.6,7



Diet and Nutritional Status:



There is some evidence to show that high intakes of saturated fats and and high glycemic load (simple sugars and refined carbohydrates) increases risk.8



Exposure to “Xeno-estrogens":



Xenoestrogens are man-made compounds that mimic estrogen’s effects.



Postmenopausal women with high serum levels of Bisphenol A (BPA) and mono-ethyl phthalatehad elevated breast density. Elevated breast density is associated with increased risk.k.9



Prevention and Early Detection



Although people can’t change their genetics, age or whether or not they are born with ovaries- they can modify their lifestyle to reduce their breast cancer risk in other ways.



Leading a healthy lifestyle with appropriate diet and lifestyle, correcting for nutritional deficiencies (like vitamin D) and optimizing overall health will reduce the risk for breast cancer.



While at the same time, following Canada’s breast cancer screening guidelines and seeking medical attention if you notice any changes to your breasts can facilitate early detection and treatment.



Naturopathic doctors excel at helping their patients optimize their health and make the changes that reduce modifiable risk factors.



Through evidence-informed knowledge, and taking a preventative approach to healthcare we can help reduce the amount of women affected by breast cancer.







If you’re curious to learn more about this subject or would like to consult with one of our NDs feel free to book a visit or contact us.



Yours in Health,





Dr. Marnie Luck, N.D







Annex Naturopathic Clinic

572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1

- https://goo.gl/maps/uVRBvcyoUa62








References:























  1. National Cancer Institute. SEER Cancer Statistics Review 1975-2004. Table IV-8. Available at: http://seer.cancer.gov/csr/1975_2004/results_merged/sect_04_breast.pdf. Accessed June 19, 2007.



  2. Association of Professors of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Breast cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment: The expanding role of the Ob/Gyn. Available at: http://www.apgo.org/elearn/APGO_BC_Monograph.pdf. Accessed January 5, 2007.



  3. American Cancer Society. Detailed Guide: Breast Cancer: What are the risk factors for breast cancer? Available at: http://www.cancer.org/docroot/CRI/

    content/CRI_2_4_2X_What_are_the_risk_factors_for_breast_cancer_5.asp?sitearea=. Accessed June 12, 2007.

  4. http://www.cancer.ca/en/cancer-information/cancer-type/breast/risks/?region=bc#family_hx
  5. Lancet Oncol. 2005 Oct;6(10):798-808.
  6. Pak J Med Sci. 2017 May-Jun; 33(3): 645–649
  7. Environ Health Perspect. 2017 Jul 6;125(7):077004. doi: 10.1289/EHP943.
  8. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2011;12(4):1061-5.
  9. Breast Cancer Res. 2013 may 27;15(3):R45.

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Marnie Luck

Annex Naturopathic Clinic (http://citynaturopathic.ca/) is a clinic in downtown Toronto that offers integrative healthcare solutions. Drs. Marnie Luck and Tanya Lee, ND, offer treatments such as diet, exercise, and lifestyle counselling, nutritional supplementation, vitamin injection therapy, bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, herbal medicine, acupuncture, and musculoskeletal manipulation, among others. You can also find us at: https://plus.google.com/+AnnexNaturopathicClinicToronto 572 Bloor St W #201, Toronto, ON M6G 1K1 647-624-5800